The Crow and The Peacock – Story for Kids

A crow lived in the forest and was absolutely satisfied in life. But one day he saw a swan. “This swan is so white,” he thought, “and I am so black. This swan must be the happiest bird in the world.” He expressed his thoughts to the swan. “Actually,” the swan replied, “I was feeling that I was the happiest bird around until I saw a parrot, which has two colors. I now think the parrot is the happiest bird in creation.” The crow then approached the parrot. The parrot explained, “I lived a very happy life until I saw a peacock. I have only two colors, but the peacock has multiple colors.” The crow then visited a peacock in the zoo and saw that hundreds of people had gathered to see him. After the people had left, the crow approached the peacock. “Dear peacock,” the crow said, “you are so beautiful. Every day thousands of people come to see you. When people see me, they immediately shoo me away. I think you are the happiest bird on the planet.”
The peacock replied, “I always thought that I was the most beautiful and happy bird on the planet. But because of my beauty, I am entrapped in this zoo. I have examined the zoo very carefully, and I have realized that the crow is the only bird not kept in a cage. So for past few days I have been thinking that if I were a crow, I could happily roam everywhere.” That’s our problem too. We make unnecessary comparison with others and become sad. We don’t value what God has given us. This all leads to the vicious cycle of unhappiness. Learn to be happy in what you have instead of looking at what you don’t have. There will always be someone who will have more or less than you have. The person who is satisfied with what he/she has, is the happiest person in the world.

Sen Nyo Rikyu: the Spirit of the Japanese Tea Ceremony — Spirit Tea

“Sen No Rikyu the founder of the Japanese Tea Ceremony committed harikiti or ritual suicide by disembowlemnet in 1591 at the order his lord Hidiyoshi. Just before he took his own life his own life he said ‘when I have this sword, there is no Buddha and no patriarchs.’He meant when we have the sword of big  mind, there is no dualistic world, and the only thing that exists is this spirit.

Source: Sen Nyo Rikyu: the Spirit of the Japanese Tea Ceremony — Spirit Tea

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sen_no_Riky%C5%AB

More: http://www.zenstoriesofthesamurai.com/Characters/Sen%20no%20Rikyu.htm

JAPANESE DEATH POEMS

JAPANESE DEATH POEMS
Written by Zen Monks and Haiku Poets on the Verge of Death

Source: Yoel Hoffmann (1937-)

DAIRIN SOTO
Died on the twenty-seventh day of the first month, 1568 at the age of eighty-nine

My whole life long I’ve sharpened my sword
And now, face to face with death
I unsheathe it, and lo–
The blade is broken–
Alas!

BASSUI TOKUSHO
Died on the twentieth day of the second month, 1387 at the age of sixty-one

Look straight ahead. What’s there?
If you see it as it is
You will never err.

 

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