How the Immune System Protects the Brain | Quanta Magazine

Now that we know the brain is not completely sequestered from the immune system, new questions arise, Schwartz said. Neurological diseases might be caused by malfunctions in communication between the brain and the immune system, rather than by problems within the brain. According to Rustenhoven, the dural sinuses offer both a location to study diseases like multiple sclerosis or even Alzheimer’s disease and a potential target for treatments.

— Read on www.quantamagazine.org/how-the-immune-system-protects-the-brain-20210428/

Spirituality is a brain state we can all reach, religious or not | Psyche Ideas

We can also train our brains to behave in a more ‘aware’ way by engaging in activities that facilitate greater connection or neural synchronisation. Higher synchronisation – imagine a large group of brain cells singing together – has been found following the practice of different contemplative paradigms, such as meditation and prayer (creating, as it were, slower ocean waves, now growing calmer and calmer). One way of interpreting this is that neuronal synchronisation enhances our brain ‘harmony’ or ‘integrity’ – achieving a state in which the brain works in a more congruent way, adopting a more global perspective. Other findings point to the psychological consequences of this state – greater neuronal synchronisation tends to enable a greater ability to make moral judgments and problem-solve creatively.
— Read on psyche.co/amp/ideas/spirituality-is-a-brain-state-we-can-all-reach-religious-or-not

‘Zombie’ genes? Research shows some genes come to life in the brain after death | EurekAlert! Science News

These ‘zombie genes’ — those that increased expression after the post-mortem interval — were specific to one type of cell: inflammatory cells called glial cells. The researchers observed that glial cells grow and sprout long arm-like appendages for many hours after death.

“That glial cells enlarge after death isn’t too surprising given that they are inflammatory and their job is to clean things up after brain injuries like oxygen deprivation or stroke,” said Dr. Jeffrey Loeb, the John S. Garvin Professor and head of neurology and rehabilitation at the UIC College of Medicine and corresponding author on the paper.

— Read on www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/uoia-gr032321.php

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